Publications

As per the guidelines of Fair Use, the "pdf" links may be used for "criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research." *denotes student

  • Sawyer, J. & Goldstein, T.R. (2019). Gaining in Drawing Skill by Reading Story Books: A Random Control Trial. Empirical Studies in the Arts, 37. https://doi.org/10.1177/0276237418777946
  • *Kou, X., Konrath, S., & Goldstein, T. R. (2019). The relationship among different types of arts engagement, empathy, and prosocial behavior. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/aca0000269
  • *DeBettignies, B. H., & Goldstein, T. R. (2019). Improvisational theater classes improve self-concept. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/aca0000260
  • Thompson, B., & Goldstein, T.R. (2019). Children Learn From Both Embodied and Passive Pretense: A Replication and Extension. Child Development, doi/pdf/10.1111/cdev.13309. 
  • *Thompson, B. N., & Goldstein, T. R. (2019). Disentangling pretend play measurement: Defining the essential elements and developmental progression of pretense. Developmental Review52, 24-41.
  • Goldstein, T.R. Lerner, M.D., Paterson, S., *Jaggi, L., Toub, T.S., Hirsh-Pasek, K., Golinkoff, R.M. (2019). Stakeholder Perceptions of the Effects of a Public School-Based Theatre Program for Children with ASD. Journal of Learning Through the Arts., https://escholarship.org/uc/item/5qg6j1n5 
  • Kapstein, A., & Goldstein, T. R. (2019). Developing wonder: Teaching theatre for the very young through collaboration with developmental psychology. Youth Theatre Journal33(1), 52-69.
  • Arora, P. G., *Levine, J. L., & Goldstein, T. R. (2019). School psychologists’ interprofessional collaboration with medical providers: An initial examination of training, preparedness, and current practices. Psychology in the Schools56(4), 554-568.
  • Goldstein, T. R., & *Alperson, K. (2019). Dancing bears and talking toasters: A content analysis of supernatural elements in children’s media. Psychology of Popular Media Culture. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/ppm0000222
  • Goldstein, T. R. (2018). From banana phones to the Bard: The developmental psychology of acting and performance. In B. McConachie & R. Kemp (eds.) The Routledge Companion to Theatre, Performance, and Cognitive Science. Routledge.
  • Goldstein, T. R. (2018). Developing a Dramatic Pretend Play Game Intervention. American Journal of Play10(3), 290-308.
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Lerner, M. (2018). Dramatic Pretend Play Games Uniquely Improve Emotional Control in Young Children. Developmental Science. Doi 10.1111/desc.12603 LINK
  • Goldstein, T. R. (2018). Scientific Truth, Artistic License, Fiction, and Reality. In Shaughnessy, N. (ed). Performing Psychologies: Imagination, Creativity and Dramas of the Mind, UK: Bloomsbury Metheun.
  • Goldstein, T. R., Lerner, M., D., & Winner, E. (2017). The arts as a venue for developmental science: Realizing a latent opportunity. Child Development, 88, 1505-1512doi: 10.1111/cdev.12884 LINK
  • Goldstein, T. R. & Filipe, A. (2017). The interpreted mind: Understanding acting. Review of General Psychology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/gpr0000116
  • Goldstein, T.R. (2017). Live Theatre as Exception and Test Case for Experiencing Negative Emotions in Art. Behavioral and Brain Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X17001704
  • Ershadi, M., Goldstein, T.R., Pochedly, J., & Russell, J.A. (2017). Facial expressions as performances in mime. Cognition and Emotion, 1-10. LINK
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Levy, A. (2017). The Constricted Muse: Acting and Creativity. In J. Kaufman, V. Glaveanu, & J. Baer (Eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Creativity Across Domains. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pdf
  • Panero, M.E. Weisberg, D.S, Black, J., Goldstein, T.R., Barnes, J., Winner, E., Brownell, H. (2017).  No Support for the Claim that Literary Fiction Uniquely and Immediately Improves Theory of Mind: A Reply to Kidd and Castano’s Commentary on Panero, Weisberg, Black, Goldstein, Barnes, Brownell, & Winner (2016). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 112, e5-e8.  LINK
  • Panero, M.E. Weisberg, D.S, Black, J., Goldstein, T.R., Barnes, J., Winner, E., Brownell, H. (2016), Does reading a single passage of literary fiction really improve theory of mind? An attempt at replication. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 111(5), e46. LINK
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Woolley, J. (2016). Ho! Ho! Who? Parent Promotion of Belief in and Live Encounters with Santa Claus. Cognitive Development 39,113-137. LINK
  • Arora, P., Kelly, J.*, & Goldstein, T.R. (2016). Current and future school psychologists’ preparedness to work with LGBT students: Role of Education and Gay-Straight Alliances. Psychology in the Schools, 53, 722-735. LINK
  • Panero, M.E., Goldstein, T.R., Rosenberg, R. *Hughes, H., & Winner, E. (2016). Do actors posses traits associated with high hypnotizability? Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts, 10, 233-239LINK
  • Feldman, D., Ward, E., Handley, S. & Goldstein, T. R (2015). Evaluating drama therapy in school settings: A case study of the ENACT program. Drama Therapy Review, 1, 127-145. LINK
  • Goldstein, T.R. (2015). Predictors of engagement in and transfer from acting training. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts, 9266-273. LINK
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Bloom, P. (2015). Is it Oscar-worthy? Children’s metarepresentational understanding of acting. PLOS One. Link
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Bloom, P. (2015). Characterizing characters: How children make sense of realistic acting. Cognitive Development, Special Issue: Cognizing the Unreal, 34, 39-50. LINK 
  • Goldstein, T.R. (2015). Understanding and feeling the emotions of your character: Commentary on Heisel. Empirical Musicology Review. 10 (2).
  • Goldstein, T.R. (2014). I’m not a doctor, but I play one on TV: Children and Adult’s understanding of acting. Conference Proceedings of the 2014 Biennial Congress of the International Association for Empirical Aesthetics. 
  • Winner, E., Goldstein, T.R., & Vincent-Lancrin, S. (2014). Does arts education foster creativity? The evidence so far. In L. O’Farrell, S. Schonmann & E. Wagner (eds). International Yearbook for Research in Arts Education, Vol 2. New York: Waxmann. Publisher link to purchase. 
  • Goldstein, T.R. & *Yasskin, R. (2014). Another pathway to understanding human nature: Theatre and dance. In P. Tinio and J. Smith (Eds.), Cambridge Handbook of the Psychology of Aesthetics and the Arts. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press.
  • Goldstein, T.R. (2013). Responses to and judgments of acting on film. The Social Science of Cinema. J. C. Kaufman and D. K. Simonton (Eds.). New York: Oxford University Press. Amazon.com link. 
  • Goldstein, T.R., Tamir, M., & Winner, E. (2013). Expressive suppression and acting classes. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts, 7, 191-196. Link
  • Winner, E., Goldstein, T.R., & Vincent- Lancrin, S. (2013). Art for Art’s Sake?: The Impact of Arts Education OECD Centre for Educational Research and Innovation. Executive summary .pdf
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Winner, E. (2012). Enhancing empathy and theory of mind. Journal of Cognition and Development, 13, 19-37. Link
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Winner. E. (2012). Sympathy for a character’s plight: Sex differences in response to theater. Empirical Studies in the Arts, 30, 129-141. Link
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Bloom, P. (2011). The mind on stage: Why cognitive scientists should study acting. Trends in Cognitive Science, 15, 141-142.  Link
  • Goldstein, T.R. (2011). Correlations among social-cognitive skills in adolescents involved in acting (vs. arts) classes. International Journal of Mind, Brain and Education, 5, 97-103.Download the .pdf
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Winner, E. (2010-2011). Engagement in role play, pretense and acting classes predict advanced theory of mind skill in middle childhood. Imagination, Cognition, and Personality, 30, 249-258.  Link
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Winner, E. (2010). A new lens on the development of social cognition: The study of acting. In C. Milbrath & C. Lightfoot (Eds.), The Arts and Human Development. New York: Taylor and Francis.  Buy at Amazon.com
  • Goldstein, T.R., *Wu, K., & Winner, E. (2009-2010). Actors are skilled in theory of mind but not empathy. Imagination, Cognition and Personality, 29, 115-133. Link
  • Goldstein, T.R. & Winner, E. (2009). Living in alternative and inner worlds: Early signs of acting talent. Creativity Research Journal, 21, 1-8.  Link
  • Goldstein, T.R. (2009). Psychological perspectives on acting. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 3, 6-9.  Link
  • Goldstein, T.R. (2009). The pleasure of pure unadulterated sadness: Experiencing sorrow in fiction, nonfiction and in our own lives. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 3, 232-237.  Link
  • Dalebroux, A., Goldstein, T.R., & Winner, E. (2008). Short-term mood repair through art- making: Attention redeployment is more effective than venting. Motivation and Emotion, 32(4), 288-295.